Addressing Wedding Invitations

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Are you getting married? Are you planning your wedding, and making your guest list? Etiquette for addressing wedding invitations can be very complicated in today’s world. So many couples are living together unmarried. Oftentimes even married couples have different last names. How do you address a single or married woman: Miss, Mrs. or Ms? How do you address a gay couple, or a gay married couple? What do you write on the inside envelope?

Luckily, there are wonderful sites that can address your concerns about the proper way to address your envelopes.

This site has helpful information for addressing your envelopes. It seems to answer any question I could think of!

http://www.emilypost.com/forms-of-address/titles/96-guide-to-addressing-correspondence

http://www.emilypost.com/invitations/addressing-wedding-invitations

black envelope with white copperplate calligraphy by Lianda Ludwig, professional calligrapher

Make certain that when you write out your list to have it written in Beautiful Calligraphy that you write it EXACTLY as you want it to appear on the envelope. If it’s a standard:

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith

123 Main Street,

Anytown, California

FULL ZIP CODE

If it’s a one line Mr. and Mrs. John Smith- you don’t have to write out again what should be written on the inside envelope.  Otherwise, please also write out the inside envelope as well.

(here’s where to find the zip code) https://tools.usps.com/go/ZipLookupAction!input.action

Inside Envelope (when there are 2 envelopes)

Here’s how to address the inside envelope when children are invited:

https://www.beautifulcalligraphy.com/addressing-family-invitation – make sure you scroll down to see the specifics

IMPORTANT NOTES:

***  Although etiquette would indicate that both names in a couple who are living together should appear on a single line, that is usually impossible. It would necessitate writing in a very small size to fit both names, and then the rest of the address would be tiny in comparison. Leave it to your professional calligrapher to determine the best size of writing for your envelope.

* Centering the address takes extra time, and therefore an additional charge. Envelopes are typically address flush left unless otherwise requested.

* Calligraphy is written in non-waterproof ink and gouache paint. The reason for using non-waterproof ink/paint is it holds thin lines (hairlines) that are impossible when using waterproof inks. When you are assembling the envelopes, make sure your hands are clean and dry. When affixing stamps, it’s better to use self sticking stamps. Don’t squish them into the corner, but give them a small amount of border, just like you would with any artwork that is framed!

Take an assembled envelope to the post office to have it weighed before you buy your stamps. I’ve seen a calligraphy job ruined when the post office stamped: Insufficient Postage on every envelope! What a bummer!

Make sure you pick a beautiful stamp, and if you need multiples, arrange them artfully!

calligraphy signature make it beautiful

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